TFM:Copyright information

From ProgSoc Wiki

Jump to: navigation, search

Dennis Cook, Chris Fraser, Stephen Boyd Gowing, Colin Panisset III
Grant Heinrich, Chris Keane, Iain Sinclair, Ryan Shelswell,
James Wondrasek, Anand Kumria, Chris Wood, Jason Crane, Naomi Hatchman,
Paul McLachlan, Matt Estela, Dennis Clark, Eliseo d’Annunzio,
Peter Meric, Andrew Wilson, Carolyn Choy, Piers Johnson, Christian Kent
Matthew Beauregard, Nicholas FitzRoy-Dale, Gabriela Marcionetti,
Catie Flick, Thomas Given-Wilson, James Ducker, Chris Deigan and Tomislav Q. Bozic
affirm the right to be identified as authors of this work.
First Edition 1993 Programmers’ Society. Limited to a single
presentation copy, printed on rice paper and bound in buck-boards.
Given to one editor by another, and then left in a taxi
between UTS and Newtown.
Second Edition July 1993. Third printing late 1993.
Fourth printing and major rewrite March 1994.
Fifth printing and merciless cutting up February 1995.
Second Volume of Fifth Printing June 1995.
Third Edition February 1996.
Fourth Edition February 1997.
Fifth Edition February/March 2003. We consider this edition
to be aged like a fine wine, rather than aged like, say,
a 7-year-old bottle of milk.
Sixth Edition February 2013. Aged like a fine scotch whisky. Nine years
have elapsed and we still can’t come up with an analogy
to best the previous one.

Authors’ Impressions
First Impression Nov. 1992 . . . A Good Thing
Second Impression Jan. 1993 . . . A Bad Thing
Third Impression Feb. 1993 . . . Anything You Say
Fourth Impression Feb. 1997 . . . Gu-huh!
Fifth Impression Feb. 2003 . . . Wow.
Sixth Impression Feb. 2013 . . . Hmm.

Permission to use, copy, modify and distribute this document for any
non-profit purpose is granted provided the above copyright notices and
this permission notice appear in all copies and neither the authors’
names or the name of the Programmers’ Society be used in advertising
or publicity pertaining to the distribution of the document without
specific prior written permission. Neither the Authors nor the
Programmers’ Society make any representations about the suitability
of this document for any purpose. It is provided “as is”, without
express or implied warranty.

The authors and the Programmers’ Society disclaim all warranties
with regard to this document including all implied warranties
of merchantability and fitness. In no event shall the authors or
the Programmers’ Society be liable for any special, indirect or
consequential damages or any damages whatsoever resulting
from loss of use or data, whether in an action of contract,
negligence or other tortuous action arising out of, or in connection
with, the use or information contained in this document.

UNIX is a trademark of The Open Group.
Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds.
The X Windows System, X and X11 are registered trademarks of MIT.
“Sun Workstation” and the Sun logo are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, a subsidiary of Oracle :O
ProgSoc logo copyright Iain Sinclair.
Front cover by Christian Kent. Used with permission.
“Prog Sock” image copyright Leefe Hicks. Used with permission.
Admiral Ackbar portrait by James Ducker.
Anatomical line art taken from Gray’s Anatomy.
PEANUTS comic strips copyright Charles M Schulz.
Calvin and Hobbes copyright Bill Watterson.
xkcd comics copyright Randall Munroe. Used under Creative Commons Licence.
Illustration (“Please, sir, I want some more”) from “Oliver Twist” by George Cruikshank.
The Rocky Horror Picture Show copyright Twentieth Century Fox.
CityRail network map copyright Rail Corporation of New South Wales.

THANKS TO
Niflheim - for serving us all through the marathon that creating this was.
Tentacle.
The UTS Union - for covering the printing costs.
The 2010 and 2011 ProgSoc Club Trivia Teams - for obtaining printing funds from the Union.

The Programmers’ Society would like to show its respect towards,
and acknowledgement of, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation,
the traditional custodians of the land upon which this book has been printed.

When in Sydney, ProgSoc members choose to stay with their parents.

Personal tools