What We Do

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Contents

Statement of Direction

Why Does ProgSoc Exist?

This is a question of some importance, as it directly affects what ProgSoc was trying to achieve when it was created and echoes of this still exist today.

In March of 1989, Chris Keane and Roland Turner approached the UTS Union with a view to setting up a Union affiliated club for people interested in programming. In fact the initial intent was specifically for those interested in UNIX system programming and kernel hacking but was later broadened to cover programming generally. The choice to be Union affiliated was to lend us some legitimacy when dealing with the University and other bodies, and to gain access to Union funding to support whatever we decided to do.

Since then, the club has grown, evolved, and moved in all kinds of directions, so read on.

From this came ProgSoc's objectives as stated in its constitution which are, briefly:

  • To encourage programming within UTS
  • To become (and remain) affiliated with the UTS Union
  • To work with and/or join organisations with similar objectives
  • To develop non-commercial software for use by others outside ProgSoc

The fourth objective initially referred to software for the UNIX operating system but was broadened to include software generally. Nonetheless, there is a great deal of interest in UNIX within ProgSoc and certainly, ProgSoc's computer installation is a collection of machines running variants of UNIX. Furthering UNIX, and helping others to use it, remains an unstated objective of the Society.

What Should ProgSoc be doing?

Well, quite a few things. Generally, anything which furthers ProgSoc's objectives.

To encourage programming:

  • Hold classes/lectures/seminars and/or produce publications to help people learn to use computers and to program them. (e.g. programming classes, guest lectures and TFM.)
  • Hold programming contests.
  • Hold non-programming contests which require (or will benefit from) an element of programming ability. (e.g. X-tank, SoCS Doom)

Provide a forum for people interested in computers and IT to interact:

  • This occurs through our weekly meetings, where we meet up to chill and discuss in a friendly environment.


Union affiliation:

  • Talk to the Union occasionally.
  • Keep the Union's paperwork flowing.

Organisations with similar objectives:

  • The only one known is Yoyo in Melbourne. There have been occasional contacts with Yoyo, but little common activity has ever arisen, simply because of distance.
  • On an international level, there exists bodies such as the Harvard Computer Society and programming societies in other Universities, but no interaction has ever been made.

Developing software:

  • There is a little of this going on. When some critical mass is reached, a registry of projects being undertaken by ProgSoc members would be appropriate. Currently however, most development is proceeding in very small, unconnected groups. Attempts to foster interest in the past have not yet yielded any substantially new development projects.


As an underlying task, ProgSoc should be (and is) running a network for members to use in furthering the Society's objectives.

  • Involvement of as many members as possible in this particular activity has been and remains a primary task for the Executive. From this joint activity and the communication that goes along with it, we expect to increase activity within ProgSoc.
  • Maintaining a good relationship with the FEIT remains important as long as we are connected to their network and occupy their space.
  • Seeking new opportunities when/if they arise for a closer relationship with ITD and/or other parts of the University is also sensible.
  • Maintaining our relationship with hardware vendors (these have included Sun & Apple) is beneficial from the standpoint of being a continuing supply of equipment to upgrade/replace old equipment. Seeking new relationships with other vendors of various types is also potentially beneficial.

So, What About the Future?

There has been no push to substantially change ProgSoc's objectives, so the appropriate activities remain much the same. The Executive encourages any and all members who are interested in setting up any activity generally in line with ProgSoc's objectives to do so. Naturally, it is to be expected that the Executive will both endeavour to facilitate and, to some extent, moderate such activities.

What do we really do?

Aside from organising programming competitions, we are primarily a collective of people interested in computing who come together to chill, discuss and make cool stuff. While programming is a theme, alot of activities centre around just computers in general, and also the execution of various projects. Don't feel dis-enchanted if you are not good at programming; if you sound like your interested in this, come along!

April 2, 1997, updated May 15, 2003 and again 25/4/13

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